Germans settling North America : going Dutch – gone American

This book demonstrates the most important features of the migration process of Germans, mostly from the North and Northwest, to North America (US and Canada) during the 17th to the 20th centuries. Two thirds of the places founded or cofounded by German settlers in North America bear "North"...

Other title:Going Dutch – gone American :
Germans settling North America
Author: Gellinek, Christian
Division/Institute:Einrichtungen außerhalb der WWU
Document types:Book
Media types:Text
Publication date:2003
Date of publication on miami:11.01.2017
Modification date:11.01.2017
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Druckausgabe unter dem Titel: Gellinek, Christian: Going Dutch – gone American : Germans settling North America. Münster : Aschendorff, 2003, ISBN 3-402-05182-6
Subjects:Nordamerika; Nordwestdeutschland; Deutsche; Einwanderung; Auswanderung; Bevölkerungsgeografie North America; Northwest Germany; German; Immigration; Emigration; Population geography
DDC Subject:300: Sozialwissenschaften, Soziologie, Anthropologie
943: Geschichte Mitteleuropas; Deutschlands
970: Geschichte Nordamerikas
Legal notice:© 2003 Aschendorff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Münster. Digitale Publikation mit Genehmigung des Verlages.
License:InC 1.0
Language:English
Notes:Addenda 2016 auf S. 213
Format:PDF document
ISBN:978-3-402-05182-5
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-53259723638
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-53259723638
Digital documents:gellinek_2003_going-dutch.pdf

This book demonstrates the most important features of the migration process of Germans, mostly from the North and Northwest, to North America (US and Canada) during the 17th to the 20th centuries. Two thirds of the places founded or cofounded by German settlers in North America bear "North" German names, one third "South" German names. This non-linear distribution pattern is indirectly dependent on the old dividing line called "Benrather Linie", separating distinctive speech patterns. These in turn influenced the name giving of places in Germany according to the multi-volume Deutsche Städtebücher. In the US this distribution pattern is rather exact, in Canada it is less pronounced. This phenomenon is governed by a sort of perceptual geography, and by the·old, ultimately Hanseatic, custom of cohesion or cohort feeling.