Objectively measured versus self-reported physical activity in children and adolescents with cancer

OBJECTIVE: Existing research recognizes low levels of physical activity in pediatric patients with cancer, but much uncertainty exists about their capability to self-reflect physical activity levels. The objective of this study was to compare results of subjective self-reports and objective accelero...

Authors: Götte, Miriam
Seidel, Corinna Caroline
Kesting, Sabine V.
Rosenbaum, Dieter
Boos, Joachim
Division/Institute:FB 05: Medizinische Fakultät
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2017
Date of publication on miami:26.04.2018
Modification date:16.04.2019
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:PLoS ONE 12 (2017) 2, e0172216, 1-10
DDC Subject:610: Medizin und Gesundheit
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Funding:Finanziert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds 2017 der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster (WWU Münster).
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-48189477168
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-48189477168
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172216
Digital documents:journal.pone.0172216.pdf

OBJECTIVE: Existing research recognizes low levels of physical activity in pediatric patients with cancer, but much uncertainty exists about their capability to self-reflect physical activity levels. The objective of this study was to compare results of subjective self-reports and objective accelerometers regarding levels of daily walking as well as moderate-to-vigorous physical activities. METHODS: Results of the objective assessment tool StepWatchTM Activity Monitor and self-reporting with a standardized questionnaire were compared in 28 children and adolescents during cancer treatment. RESULTS: The patients were 13.8±2.8 years of age and 3.4±2.0 months after cancer diagnosis. The Bland-Altman plots indicated a fairly symmetrical under- and over-estimation for daily minutes of walking with the limits of agreement ranging from -100.8 to 87.3 min (d = -6.7 min). Mean difference for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was almost zero but limits of agreement are ranging from -126.8 to 126.9 min. The comparison for the days with at least 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity showed a marked difference with 3.0±2.6 self-reported days versus only 0.1±0.4 measured days. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that physical activity in pediatric cancer patients should preferably be assessed with objective methods. Greater efforts are needed to implement supervised exercise interventions during treatment incorporating methods to improve self-reflection of physical activity.