Establishment of a reliable in-vivo model of implant-associated infection to investigate innovative treatment options

The increasing number of implant-associated infections and of multiresistant pathogens is a major problem in the daily routine. In the field of osteomyelitis, it is difficult to manage a valid clinical study because of multiple influencing factors. Therefore, models of osteomyelitis with a simulatio...

Authors: Kreis, Carolin Anna-Amalie
Aschenbrenner, Fania
Günther, D.
Tholema‑Hans, Nancy
Koeppe, Jeanette
Roßlenbroich, Steffen Bernd
Raschke, Michael J.
Fuchs, Thomas
Division/Institute:FB 05: Medizinische Fakultät
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2022
Date of publication on miami:15.09.2023
Modification date:15.09.2023
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Scientific Reports 12 (2022), 3979, 1-14
Subjects:Health care; Medical research
DDC Subject:610: Medizin und Gesundheit
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Funding:Finanziert über die DEAL-Vereinbarung mit Wiley 2019-2022.
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-29918724944
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.17879/39918711742
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-29918724944
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  • Digital documents:10.1038_s41598-022-07673-8.pdf

    The increasing number of implant-associated infections and of multiresistant pathogens is a major problem in the daily routine. In the field of osteomyelitis, it is difficult to manage a valid clinical study because of multiple influencing factors. Therefore, models of osteomyelitis with a simulation of the pathophysiology to evaluate treatment options for implant-associated infections are necessary. The aim of this study is to develop a standardized and reproducible osteomyelitis model in-vivo to improve treatment options. This study analyses the influence of a post-infectious implant exchange one week after infection and the infection progress afterward in combination with a systemic versus a local antibiotic treatment in-vivo. Therefore, the implant exchange, the exchange to a local drug-delivery system with gentamicin, and the implant removal are examined. Furthermore, the influence of an additional systemic antibiotic therapy is evaluated. An in-vivo model concerning the implant exchange is established that analyzes clinic, radiologic, microbiologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical diagnostics to obtain detailed evaluation and clinical reproducibility. Our study shows a clear advantage of the combined local and systemic antibiotic treatment in contrast to the implant removal and to a non-combined antibiotic therapy. Group genta/syst. showed the lowest infection rate with a percentage of 62.5% concerning microbiologic analysis, which is in accordance with the immunohistochemical, cytochemical, histologic, and radiologic analysis. Our in-vivo rat model has shown valid and reproducible results, which will lead to further investigations regarding treatment options and influencing factors concerning the therapy of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections.