Conical Refraction Bottle Beams for Entrapment of Absorbing Droplets

Conical refraction (CR) optical bottle beams for photophoretic trapping of airborne absorbing droplets are introduced and experimentally demonstrated. CR describes the circular split-up of unpolarised light propagating along an optical axis in a biaxial crystal. The diverging and converging cones le...

Authors: Eßeling, Michael
Alpmann, Christina
Schnelle, Jens
Meißner, Robert
Denz, Cornelia
Division/Institute:FB 11: Physik
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2018
Date of publication on miami:16.05.2019
Modification date:16.05.2019
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Scientific Reports 8 (2018) 5029, 1-8
DDC Subject:530: Physik
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Funding:Finanziert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds 2018 der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) und der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster (WWU Münster).
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-84199565072
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-84199565072
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-23399-y
Digital documents:artikel_denz_2018.pdf

Conical refraction (CR) optical bottle beams for photophoretic trapping of airborne absorbing droplets are introduced and experimentally demonstrated. CR describes the circular split-up of unpolarised light propagating along an optical axis in a biaxial crystal. The diverging and converging cones lend themselves to the construction of optical bottle beams with flexible entry points. The interaction of single inkjet droplets with an open or partly open bottle beam is shown implementing high-speed video microscopy in a dual-view configuration. Perpendicular image planes are visualized on a single camera chip to characterize the integral three-dimensional movement dynamics of droplets. We demonstrate how a partly opened optical bottle transversely confines liquid objects. Furthermore we observe and analyse transverse oscillations of absorbing droplets as they hit the inner walls and simultaneously measure both transverse and axial velocity components.