Interventions for posttraumatic stress disorder in psychiatric practice across Europe: a trainees’ perspective

Background: With an annual prevalence of 0.9–2.6%, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is very common in clinical practice across Europe. Despite the fact that evidence-based interventions have been developed, there is no evidence on their implementation in clinical practice and in national psychia...

Authors: Kölkebeck, Katja
Andlauer, Olivier
Jovanović, Nikolina
Giacco, Domenico
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2015
Date of publication on miami:09.09.2015
Modification date:16.04.2019
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:European Journal of Psychotraumatology 6 (2015) 27818, 1-5
Subjects:educational status; healthcare surveys; psychotherapy; PTSD
DDC Subject:610: Medizin und Gesundheit
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Notes:Finanziert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds 2015/2016 der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster (WWU Münster).
Format:PDF document
ISSN:2000-8066
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-68249707874
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-68249707874
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.3402/ejpt.v6.27818
Digital documents:27818-171189-1-PB.pdf

Background: With an annual prevalence of 0.9–2.6%, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is very common in clinical practice across Europe. Despite the fact that evidence-based interventions have been developed, there is no evidence on their implementation in clinical practice and in national psychiatric training programmes. Objective and method: The Early Career Psychiatrists Committee of the European Psychiatric Association conducted a survey in 23 European countries to explore implementation of evidence-based interventions for PTSD and training options. Results: The findings indicate that pharmacotherapy was available in the majority of the participating countries (n=19, 82.8%). However, psychological interventions were much less widespread. For example, psychoeducation was widely available in 52% of the countries (n=12), cognitive-behavioural therapy in 26.2% (n=6), and specific trauma-focused techniques were rarely available. Training on PTSD was part of the official training in 13 countries (56.5%), predominantly in the form of theoretical seminars. Conclusions: Overall, this survey indicates that the treatment for PTSD is largely focused on pharmacotherapy, with psychological evidence-based interventions poorly available, especially outside specialized centres. Poor implementation is linked to the lack of official training in evidence-based interventions for psychiatric trainees across Europe.