Entrepreneurial potential in chemistry and pharmacy : results from a large survey

Nowadays entrepreneurship has become an unavoidable issue.Given its documented relevance for regions’ and countries’ economic growth, increasingly governments, educators, and scientists try to uncover the determinants of entrepreneurship seeking ultimately to promote entrepreneurial skills amongst o...

Author: Teixeira, Aurora Amélia Castro
Division/Institute:FB 12: Chemie und Pharmazie
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2008
Date of publication on miami:08.06.2008
Modification date:11.11.2015
Source:Journal of Business Chemistry, 5 (2008) 2, S. 48-63
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
DDC Subject:330: Wirtschaft
License:InC 1.0
Language:English
Notes:Section "Research Section"
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-94599463005
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-94599463005
Digital documents:2008_vol5_iss2_48-63.pdf

Nowadays entrepreneurship has become an unavoidable issue.Given its documented relevance for regions’ and countries’ economic growth, increasingly governments, educators, and scientists try to uncover the determinants of entrepreneurship seeking ultimately to promote entrepreneurial skills amongst our youngest. Notwithstanding such trend, studies targeting entrepreneurial potential among students, namely university students are not abundant. In general, those few that exist focus on one school/one course, often from business related areas. To our best knowledge no study has analyzed the entrepreneurial potential of students fromchemistry and pharmacy courses. The empirical results,based on a large-scale survey of 2,430 final-year students, 194 of whomare fromchemistry (science and engineering) and pharmacy courses at the largest Portuguese university, reveal that the latter have higher entrepreneurial potential than students from other courses and that no statistical difference exists in this regard among chemistry and the other students (excluding those from pharmacy). In chemistry and pharmacy courses themain determinant of entrepreneurial potential is students’ propensity for risk taking. Creativity, leadership and innovative traits failed to explain these students entrepreneurial propensity. In an economic environment which increasingly demands for novelty and creativity this is likely to constitute a troublesome finding and is an important point to be addressed both by policy makers and educators.