'In future, only female teachers'

This paper examines the employment of teachers at the school on the Ramahyuck mission station in eastern Victoria in the latter half of the nineteenth century. It demonstrates that both physical exhaustion as well as a difficult head missionary resulted in a frequent turnover of staff. Moreover, com...

Other title:'In future, only female teachers' :
Staffing the Ramahyuck mission school in the nineteenth century
Author: Jensz, Felicity
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2012
Date of publication on miami:10.03.2021
Modification date:11.03.2021
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Manuskriptfassung der Druckausgabe: Provenance: The Journal of Public Record Office Victoria (2012) 11, ISSN 1832-2522, 15-25
Subjects:Missionschulen; Kolonialgeschichte Australiens; Bildung; Exzellenzcluster Religion und Politik Mission schools; colonial Australia; education; Cluster of Excellence Religion and Politics
DDC Subject:200: Religion
370: Bildung und Erziehung
License:InC 1.0
Language:English
Notes:Die Veröffentlichung erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Herausgeber des Journals Provenance: The Journal of Public Record Office Victoria.
Die Abbildungen im Artikel wurden aus urheberrechtlichen Gründen geschwärzt.
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-38039426878
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-38039426878
Digital documents:jensz_2012_future.pdf

This paper examines the employment of teachers at the school on the Ramahyuck mission station in eastern Victoria in the latter half of the nineteenth century. It demonstrates that both physical exhaustion as well as a difficult head missionary resulted in a frequent turnover of staff. Moreover, comments from the teachers supply us with an insight into the daily running of this school for Koorie children. Although the school was on a mission station, the files from the Board for the Protection of Aborigines do not allow a detailed reconstruction of the teaching history of the school, in contrast to the files of the Education Department, which do. By examining one file held at Public Record Office Victoria at length and contextualising it with cross departmental correspondence, we can also gain an understanding of where the jurisdictions of each department lay, and of how both teachers and missionaries responded to these structures. The teacher centred correspondence does not allow an insight into the responses from Koorie children, and thus their voices cannot be uncovered from these sources. The engagement of Koorie mothers in their children’s education is, however, evident within the file. In the historiography of mission stations in colonial Victoria, historians mostly use material written by missionaries, Church bodies or the Aboriginal Protection Board. This examination of the writings of teachers themselves reveals a new perspective on a Koorie school.