‘What Justice Requires’ – a State-Centric Bias in the Ethics of Migration

In this paper I clarify and scrutinize some of the implications of a state-centric bias in political philosophy. Based on Serena Parekh’s analysis of “the ethics of admission” (2014, 2017), the main example of this bias I will present is how political philosophers have addressed the question of what...

Author: Servan, Johannes
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2019
Date of publication on miami:11.04.2019
Modification date:16.04.2019
Source:Proceedings of the 2018 ZiF Workshop “Studying Migration Policies at the Interface between Empirical Research and Normative Analysis”, S. 8
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Matthias Hoesch/Lena Laube (eds.): Proceedings of the 2018 ZiF Workshop “Studying Migration Policies at the Interface between Empirical Research and Normative Analysis”, 125-137. DOI: 10.17879/85189704253
Subjects:Staatszentriertheit; Migrationsethik; Flüchtlinge; Weltbürgerrecht state-centric bias; ethics of migration; refugees; cosmopolitan law
DDC Subject:172: Politische Ethik
325: Internationale Migration, Kolonisation
353: Einzelne Bereiche der öffentlichen Verwaltung
License:CC BY-SA 4.0
Language:English
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-95189432369
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-95189432369
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.17879/95189431960
Digital documents:artikel_servan_2019_what-justice-requires.pdf

In this paper I clarify and scrutinize some of the implications of a state-centric bias in political philosophy. Based on Serena Parekh’s analysis of “the ethics of admission” (2014, 2017), the main example of this bias I will present is how political philosophers have addressed the question of what justice requires of states in relation to refugees. I begin by clarifying the central features of the state-centric bias in political philosophy and how it is given concrete expression in the ethics of migration as an emphasis on obligations of hosting states to admit immigrants. Further, I present one central implications of the ethics of admission that seem morally unacceptable: the cherry-picking of problems. This is a shortened version of a paper in progress.