The influenza replication blocking inhibitor LASAG does not sensitize human epithelial cells for bacterial infections

Severe influenza virus (IV) infections still represent a major challenge to public health. To combat IV infections, vaccines and antiviral compounds are available. However, vaccine efficacies vary with very limited to no protection against newly emerging zoonotic IV introductions. In addition, the d...

Authors: Wilden, Janine J.
Krüchten, Andre van
Gieselmann, Lutz
Hrincius, Eike-Roman
Deinhardt-Emmer, Stefanie
Haupt, Karoline F.
Preugschas, Hannah Franziska
Niemann, Silke
Ludwig, Stephan
Ehrhardt, Christina
Division/Institute:FB 13: Biologie
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2020
Date of publication on miami:19.05.2020
Modification date:19.05.2020
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:PLoS ONE 15 (2020) 5, e0233052, 1-14
DDC Subject:570: Biowissenschaften; Biologie
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Funding:This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft [grants SFB 1009, project B01 (S.N) and B02 (J.J.W.)(C.E.), Lu477/23-1(S.L.)], the Juergen Manchot Stiftung (A.vK.)(C.E.) and the MedK Muenster (L.G.).
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-81129433485
Permalink:http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-81129433485
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0233052
Digital documents:artikel_wilden_2020.pdf

Severe influenza virus (IV) infections still represent a major challenge to public health. To combat IV infections, vaccines and antiviral compounds are available. However, vaccine efficacies vary with very limited to no protection against newly emerging zoonotic IV introductions. In addition, the development of resistant virus variants against currently available antivirals can be rapidly detected, in consequence demanding the design of novel antiviral strategies. Virus supportive cellular signaling cascades, such as the NF-κB pathway, have been identified to be promising antiviral targets against IV in in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials. While administration of NF-κB pathway inhibiting agents, such as LASAG results in decreased IV replication, it remained unclear whether blocking of NF-κB might sensitize cells to secondary bacterial infections, which often come along with viral infections. Thus, we examined IV and Staphylococcus aureus growth during LASAG treatment. Interestingly, our data reveal that the presence of LASAG during superinfection still leads to reduced IV titers. Furthermore, the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway resulted in decreased intracellular Staphylococcus aureus loads within epithelial cells, indicating a dependency on the pathway for bacterial uptake. Unfortunately, so far it is not entirely clear if this phenomenon might be a drawback in bacterial clearance during infection.