Sarcoma on Ski: Individual Skiing Concepts Enable Autonomous Skiing After Multimodal Therapy for Pediatric Muscular-Skeletal Tumors

Long-term physical impairments are frequent consequences of multimodal therapy for malignant pediatric sarcomas. Surgical interventions like endoprosthetic support or amputations limit participation in many popular sportive activities. Demanding sports like alpine skiing are automatically avoided. D...

Authors: Kesting, Sabine V.
Götte, Miriam
Boll, Eike
Taraks, Silke
Gosheger, Georg
Streitbürger, Arne
Hardes, Jendrik
Boos, Joachim
Division/Institute:FB 05: Medizinische Fakultät
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2017
Date of publication on miami:07.03.2019
Modification date:16.04.2019
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
DDC Subject:610: Medizin und Gesundheit
License:CC BY-SA 4.0
Language:English
Notes:Journal of Orthopedic Research and Physiotherapy 3 (2017) 2, 034, 1-7
Funding:Finanziert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds 2017 der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster (WWU Münster).
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-85169428072
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.24966/ORP-2052/100034
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-85169428072
Digital documents:artikel_boos_2017.pdf

Long-term physical impairments are frequent consequences of multimodal therapy for malignant pediatric sarcomas. Surgical interventions like endoprosthetic support or amputations limit participation in many popular sportive activities. Demanding sports like alpine skiing are automatically avoided. Due to the potentials of skiing as an individually adaptable sport, preexisting family-oriented skiing camps for survivors of pediatric cancer since 1994 were expanded to children with sarcomas even with accompanying physical impairments or reduced movement patterns. This work summarizes the individual solutions for 31 participants with soft-tissue sarcomas and bone tumors (age 14 ± 6.5 years, 48% male, various surgical techniques) to detect underlying challenges, benefits and limits of skiing and to improve the decision making process with regard to the optimal skiing technique. All children and adolescents learned skiing in accordance to their individual abilities and limitations. Skiing techniques varied from conventional upright skiing, to one-leg skiing or sit ski. Four case examples are presented in detail. Findings suggest that skiing after pediatric sarcoma is feasible. The wide range of possible adaptions and skiing techniques obviate exclusion of handicapped children in skiing holidays or school ski trips. Interdisciplinary collaborations, professional support and specific equipment and methodology are the key points of successful concepts.