Problem solving in the mathematics classroom : perspectives and practices from different countries

Problem solving is a cornerstone of the school mathematics curricula in many countries, as it is an essential part of mathematical knowledge and performance. Implementation of problem solving in school mathematics is also important for meeting society’s needs with respect to work, school, and life -...

Further contributors: Kuzle, Ana (Editor)
Rott, Benjamin (Editor)
Hodnik Čadež, Tatjana (Editor)
Document types:Book
Media types:Text
Publication date:2016
Date of publication on miami:30.01.2017
Modification date:12.12.2019
Series:Ars Inveniendi et Dejudicandi, Bd. 7
Publisher: WTM-Verlag für wissenschaftliche Texte und Medien
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Subjects:Problemlösen; Mathematikunterricht
DDC Subject:370: Bildung und Erziehung
510: Mathematik
Legal notice:© 2016 WTM – Verlag für wissenschaftliche Texte und Medien, Münster
License:InC 1.0
Language:English
Notes:Druckausgabe: Kuzle, Ana; Rott, Benjamin; Hodnik Čadež, Tatjana (Hrsg.): Problem solving in the mathematics classroom : perspectives and practices from different countries. Münster : WTM, 2016. (Ars Inveniendi et Dejudicandi ; 7), ISBN 978-3-95987-007-8
Format:PDF document
ISBN:978-3-95987-008-5
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-63239467138
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-63239467138
Digital documents:wtm_isbn-978-3-95987-008-5.pdf
Use restricted. Please contact ServicePunkt Digitale Dienste at ULB Münster (miami@uni-muenster.de).

Problem solving is a cornerstone of the school mathematics curricula in many countries, as it is an essential part of mathematical knowledge and performance. Implementation of problem solving in school mathematics is also important for meeting society’s needs with respect to work, school, and life - as well as for stimulating the interest and enthusiasm of students. Countries such as Finland, Germany, Hungary, and Slovenia have a long tradition of problem solving in school mathematics. Each country has faced its own specific challenges when adopting problem solving as a constituent part of school mathematics. But through this process they have gained experience and discovered chances for integrating problem solving into mathematics lessons. The heart of achieving this mission lies in choosing good mathematical problems. Good mathematical problems are those that are not too difficult and not too easy, are interesting, challenging, and mathematically rich. They should invite students to conjecture and to explore different strategies, support extending their existing knowledge, and allow for problem extension. In this book, the reader will find such rich mathematical problems - targeting students at different school levels - that can help cultivate a problem solving culture. The book provides the coherence and direction from different perspectives that practitioners need when integrating problem solving into their teaching practices and using problem solving to teach mathematics. We believe, that the processes which accompany problem solving, contribute to both the development of students’ mathematical reasoning and to the development of their sense of autonomy.