Trait anxiety predicts amygdalar responses during direct processing of threat-related pictures

Previous studies on the associations between trait anxiety and amygdalar responses to threat stimuli have resulted in mixed findings, possibly due to sample characteristics, specific tasks, and analytical methods. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to investigate li...

Authors: Lin, Huiyan
Miltner, Wolfgang
Straube, Thomas
Division/Institute:FB 05: Medizinische Fakultät
Document types:Article
Media types:Text
Publication date:2021
Date of publication on miami:23.03.2023
Modification date:23.03.2023
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Source:Scientific Reports 11 (2021), 18469, 1-10
Subjects:Neuroscience; Psychology
DDC Subject:610: Medizin und Gesundheit
License:CC BY 4.0
Language:English
Funding:Finanziert über die DEAL-Vereinbarung mit Wiley 2019-2022.
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-80089431983
Other Identifiers:DOI: 10.17879/10099519590
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-80089431983
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  • Digital documents:10.1038_s41598-021-98023-7.pdf

    Previous studies on the associations between trait anxiety and amygdalar responses to threat stimuli have resulted in mixed findings, possibly due to sample characteristics, specific tasks, and analytical methods. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to investigate linear or non-linear associations between trait anxiety and amygdalar responses in a sample of participants with low, medium, and high trait anxiety scores. During scanning, participants were presented with threat-related or neutral pictures and had either to solve an emotional task or an emotional-unrelated distraction task. Results showed that only during the explicit task trait anxiety was associated with right amygdalar responses to threat-related pictures as compared to neutral pictures. The best model was a cubic model with increased amygdala responses for very low and medium trait anxiety values but decreased amygdala activation for very high trait anxiety values. The findings imply a non-linear relation between trait anxiety and amygdala activation depending on task conditions.