Computerized Paired Comparison of Values (CPCV): Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Validity of an Alternative Form of Measuring Value Preferences : Revised and extended paper presented at the IACCP 21st International Congress, July 17-21 2012, Stellenbosch, South Africa

We developed a new instrument for assessing value preferences by paired comparisons, the Computerized Paired Comparisons of Values (CPCV). Information about this instrument is presented, together with validation data from Germany, Brazil, Spain, and Israel. Altogether 1097 subjects received a 45 gra...

Authors: Bilsky, Wolfgang
Gollan, Tobias
Grad, Hector
Teixeira, Maria Luisa Mendes
Rodríguez Monter, Miryam
Roccas, Sonia
Schweiger-Gallo, Inge
Segal-Caspi, Lihi
Division/Institute:FB 07: Psychologie und Sportwissenschaft
Document types:Working paper
Media types:Text
Publication date:2012
Date of publication on miami:23.07.2019
Modification date:03.06.2022
Series:Berichte aus der Arbeitseinheit Differentielle Psychologie und Persönlichkeitspsychologie, Bd. 35
Edition statement:[Electronic ed.]
Subjects:value preferences; paired comparisons; Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ-40); Multitrait-Multimethod-Analyses; Big Five Inventory (BFI-10); cross-cultural research
DDC Subject:150: Psychologie
License:InC 1.0
Language:English
Notes:Berichte aus der Arbeitseinheit Differentielle Psychologie und Persönlichkeitspsychologie
Format:PDF document
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-04139539515
Permalink:https://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hbz:6-04139539515
Digital documents:bericht_bpi-iv_2012_35.pdf

We developed a new instrument for assessing value preferences by paired comparisons, the Computerized Paired Comparisons of Values (CPCV). Information about this instrument is presented, together with validation data from Germany, Brazil, Spain, and Israel. Altogether 1097 subjects received a 45 graded paired comparisons task. On each trial, two of the ten basic values proposed by Schwartz (1992) were presented. Subjects indicated the degree to which one basic value is more important than the other. Importance scores were analyzed together with scores based on Schwartz’s Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ-40). Multitrait-Multimethod-Analyses were accomplished for each country. In addition, correlations between the CPCV- and PVQ-scores and the 10-Item Big Five Inventory (BFI-10) were computed for the German, Spanish, and the Israeli samples. The results of these analyses corroborate the validity of our paired comparisons approach across countries. The advantages of paired com-parisons over rating and ranking procedures for assessing values in cross cultural research are discussed.